ALIVE.

&& believe in it.

110 notes

fastcompany:

Does your morning look like Margaret Thatcher’s, or Ben Franklin’s? These routines might inspire you to create your own.
Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, we all start our day at some point. And we all seem to start it differently.
Some of us hop online to check social media, others dive in to email, still others eat breakfast, exercise, or pack lunches for the kids. There’re a million different ways a morning could go.
Which morning routine might be best?
While there’s probably not an ideal morning routine that fits everyone, we can learn a lot from the morning routines of successful people as well as from the research and inspiration behind starting a morning on the right foot.
I collected a wide range of opinions on how best to start a day, from the scientific to the successful. Here’s the best of what I found—maybe it’ll help you get a little more productivity, creativity, and enjoyment out of your morning.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Does your morning look like Margaret Thatcher’s, or Ben Franklin’s? These routines might inspire you to create your own.

Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, we all start our day at some point. And we all seem to start it differently.

Some of us hop online to check social media, others dive in to email, still others eat breakfast, exercise, or pack lunches for the kids. There’re a million different ways a morning could go.

Which morning routine might be best?

While there’s probably not an ideal morning routine that fits everyone, we can learn a lot from the morning routines of successful people as well as from the research and inspiration behind starting a morning on the right foot.

I collected a wide range of opinions on how best to start a day, from the scientific to the successful. Here’s the best of what I found—maybe it’ll help you get a little more productivity, creativity, and enjoyment out of your morning.

Read More>

121 notes

20 New Yorker Design Stories To Read Now

fastcodesign:

Curl up with your iPad while the archives are free

image

So far, the best thing about the New Yorker’s digital revamp is not the new site design, but rather the opening of the magazine’s storied archives. For the next three months, articles dating back to 2007 (plus select additional features) are free to all visitors, offering non-subscribers a chance to revisit some of the best design writing of the past decade.

Here are Co.Design’s picks for your weekend reading. 

(via fastcompany)

82 notes

fastcompany:

What’s life really like designing for Apple? An alum shares what he learned during his seven years in Cupertino.
Apple is synonymous with upper echelon design, but very little is known about the company’s design process. Most of Apple’s own employees aren’t allowed inside Apple’s fabled design studios. So we’re left piecing together interviews, or outright speculating about how Apple does it and what it’s really like to be a designer at the company.
Enter Mark Kawano. Before founding Storehouse, Kawano was a senior designer at Apple for seven years, where he worked on Aperture and iPhoto. Later, Kawano became Apple’s User Experience Evangelist, guiding third-party app iOS developers to create software that felt right on Apple’s platforms. Kawano was with the company during a critical moment, as Apple released the iPhone and created the wide world of apps.
In an interview with Co.Design (fastcodesign), Kawano spoke frankly about his time at Apple—and especially wanted to address all the myths the industry has about the company and about its people.
Read More>

fastcompany:

What’s life really like designing for Apple? An alum shares what he learned during his seven years in Cupertino.

Apple is synonymous with upper echelon design, but very little is known about the company’s design process. Most of Apple’s own employees aren’t allowed inside Apple’s fabled design studios. So we’re left piecing together interviews, or outright speculating about how Apple does it and what it’s really like to be a designer at the company.

Enter Mark Kawano. Before founding Storehouse, Kawano was a senior designer at Apple for seven years, where he worked on Aperture and iPhoto. Later, Kawano became Apple’s User Experience Evangelist, guiding third-party app iOS developers to create software that felt right on Apple’s platforms. Kawano was with the company during a critical moment, as Apple released the iPhone and created the wide world of apps.

In an interview with Co.Design (fastcodesign), Kawano spoke frankly about his time at Apple—and especially wanted to address all the myths the industry has about the company and about its people.

Read More>